In 1935, the Social Security Act was passed by Congress and marked the beginning of an unemployment insurance benefit program throughout the United States. The intent of the act was to provide an economic safety net for people when they lost their jobs while also stabilizing the economy. Originally, recipients would be eligible for a maximum of 16 weeks of benefits. In most cases today, that number is now 26 weeks of benefits.

Under the direction of the United States Department of Labor, unemployment benefits are administered by each state. Unemployment insurance is funded through taxes paid by employers, and all employers are required to carry coverage.

If you are laid off from a job due to downsizing, your employer closes their doors, or for any number of reasons you are no longer employed through no fault of your own, you are more than likely eligible for unemployment insurance benefits. However, if you quit your job or you are fired for just cause, you may not be able to collect benefits.

Because each state administers its own program, the dollar amounts and duration of benefits will vary from state to state. Benefits are not based on financial need, and anyone meeting unemployment insurance eligibility criteria can collect benefits.

How to file a claim for Unemployment Benefits

The single most important thing to remember when dealing with unemployment insurance is to file a claim as soon as possible after you become unemployed. 

Chances are you will be in an emotional state if your detachment was unexpected, and you may experience a sense of awkwardness in going from a gainfully employed person to one who is seeking help. But you need to set these feelings and emotions aside for your own good and file the necessary paperwork immediately to protect your financial well-being.

To file your claim, contact your state unemployment insurance agency. Claims can generally be filed online, although there are some instances where claims can be filed over the telephone or by mail. 

You should always file your unemployment benefits claim in the state where you worked. But if you no longer live in that state or you worked in several states, you should contact your current state unemployment agency for clarification on how to proceed.

You should have the following information available when you file your claim:

  • Name, address, telephone
  • Social security number OR Alien Registration card number
  • Driver’s license or ID card number
  • 18 months of employment history:
  • Names/addresses of former employer(s)
  • Employment dates
  • Most recent employers’ Employer Registration number or Federal Employer Identification Number, if you have it.

The importance of your Unemployment base period

Unemployment insurance benefits are calculated for hours you work and income you earn in what is known as a base period. Literally defined, a base period is information used to base the amount of benefits you will receive.

In most instances, your base period is the most recent four out of the last five full calendar quarters before your claim is filed.

For example, if you file a claim in April 2016, the base period used to calculate eligibility would be January 2015 through December 2015.

Date of Claim
Base Period
Jan-Mar
Oct-Dec [2 years previous], Jan-Sept [previous year]
April-June
Jan-Dec [previous year]
July-Sep
April-Dec [previous year], Jan-March [current year]
Oct-Dec
July-Dec [previous year], Jan-June [current year]

If you don't qualify for unemployment benefits based on a standard base period, many states have an alternate base period you can use to qualify. It is usually the four most recent calendar quarters before the claim is filed.

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How will I receive my unemployment benefits (money)?

According to the Department of Labor, after you file a claim, it will take approximately two to three weeks before you see your first benefit check.

In some states, you will have a one-week waiting period between the time you become unemployed and when you first become eligible for benefits. You will not receive unemployment compensation for this week when that is the case. After the waiting period, it generally takes an additional week to process your claim.

How much money you receive will generally be calculated on a percentage of your prior earnings during your base period, up to a cap limit set by the state in which you apply for benefits. Currently, weekly benefit amounts range up to $900 per week, but the vast majority of people receive between $200 and $400 per week.

How long can I receive benefits?

In most states, you are eligible to receive 26 weeks of payments, although there are some exceptions as noted here:

State
Maximum weeks of benefits
Florida
19
Georgia
18
Massachusetts
30
Michigan
20
Missouri
20
Montana
28
North Carolina
19
South Carolina
20

The other factor that determines how long you can continue to receive benefits is by keeping your claim in good standing.

To do so, you must file weekly or bi-weekly claims depending on what state you are in. The claim forms are simple, but you will be required to:

  • Answer questions to prove you are still eligible.
  • Report earnings and any job offers you have received.
  • Report to your local State Unemployment Insurance Agency or One-Stop/Employment Service Office when you are scheduled to.
  • Report for all scheduled interviews.

If you delay in filing a claim form or you do not answer all questions, or you commit fraud in doing so, your benefits may be delayed or discontinued.

How to collect unemployment benefits if you are self-employed

Statistics show that more and more people are choosing to be self-employed as a sole proprietor or the owner of a small start-up firm, making use of technology to create niches for themselves as the United States continues to move toward a virtual economy.

Entrepreneurship is exciting and comes with a big set of rewards, but it also comes with a certain amount of risk attached to it as well. Most times, you are operating without a financial safety net. But the good news is, when you meet certain conditions, you can collect unemployment insurance benefits.

The key for you to understand is that before you can take money out of the system, you must pay money into the system.

The easiest way for self-employed people to do so is to set their business up as an “S” corporation. Them you must also structure the corporation so that you draw a salary as an “employee” of the corporation. When you draw a salary, you’ll then be required to pay a percentage of your earnings into your state’s unemployment compensation fund. 

If you are self-employed but choose to remain so as a sole proprietor, freelancer or independent contractor, you won’t be able to draw unemployment because you have not set up the mechanisms necessary to pay into your state’s unemployment benefits fund.

One thing to be cognizant of is that rules regarding unemployment benefits and eligibility will vary from state to state. Some states do not require you to pay state unemployment insurance even if you have an S corporation. Others may require you to pay just the federal unemployment tax, but that does not necessarily mean you’ll be eligible to collect state unemployment benefits. 

The best thing to do is to check with your particular state’s unemployment benefits administrator and find out exactly what rules apply to you before creating an “S” corporation. 

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Why was my unemployment claim denied?

When you submit a claim for unemployment, it is reviewed by the appropriate agency in your state. They will make a determination as to whether or not your claim is valid, entitling you to benefits or not. There are some instances why your claim may be denied.

You quit your job. If you voluntarily make the choice to leave your employer, you will be held accountable as the party at fault for becoming unemployed. In some instances, you may be able to cite a “just cause” that will allow you to collect unemployment, but those reasons can be difficult to prove.

You were fired. If your actions at your job through misconduct or other job performance issues cause you to be fired, then your unemployment insurance claim will probably be turned down. In some states, you can also be fired for misconduct that takes place outside the workplace as well.

Not looking for work. If you are already receiving benefits and you don’t report your job hunting activities in a timely fashion, your benefits may be discontinued.

Receiving severance pay. If you’re getting severance pay from your employer, then you are receiving income and this may disqualify you from getting unemployment insurance benefits for the duration that the severance pay is in effect.

Unable to work. If you have activities or conditions that prevent you from working, your unemployment insurance claims may be turned down or temporarily halted until you are able to be active in seeking work again. This might include things such as a family emergency, personal medical issues or other related matters.

Lying about your job situation. Committing fraud by failing to report that you’ve started a new job or that you are getting income as an independent contractor may result in you having to repay benefits that you were not entitled to, and could even possibly land you in jail. 

If you are denied benefits when you file an unemployment insurance claim, you have the right to appeal the decision. You will be given an opportunity to make your case in an attempt to gain benefits you feel you are entitled to.

For more information on Unemployment in Your State

The federal government provides broad oversight for unemployment benefits, but each state administers their own unemployment insurance program. Here are contacts for each state’s program.

State
Contact
Alabama AL Unemployment
Alabama (AL) Unemployment Eligibility
Alaska AK Unemployment
Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development:
http://labor.alaska.gov/unemployment/
Arizona AZ Unemployment
Check Eligibility for Arizona Unemployment Benefits
Arkansas AR Unemployment
Arkansas Department of Workforce Services:
http://www.arkansas.gov/esd/UI/index.htm 
California CA Unemployment
California Unemployment Eligibility
Colorado CO Unemployment
Colorado Unemployment Eligibility
Connecticut CT Unemployment
Connecticut Department of Labor: 
http://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/HP/UIServices.htm
Delaware DE Unemployment
State of Delaware, Division of Unemployment Insurance: 
http://ui.delawareworks.com/
District of Columbia DC Unemployment
DC Department of Employment Services: 
http://does.dc.gov/page/unemployment-compensation
Florida FL Unemployment
Florida FL Unemployment Eligibility
Georgia GA Unemployment
Georgia GA Unemployment Eligibility
Hawaii HI Unemployment
State of Hawaii, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations: 
http://labor.hawaii.gov/
Idaho ID Unemployment
Idaho Department of Labor: 
http://labor.idaho.gov/
Illinois IL Unemployment
Illinois Unemployment Eligibility Information
Indiana IN Unemployment
Indiana Unemployment Eligibility
Iowa IA Unemployment
Iowa Unemployment Benefits and Eligibility
Kansas KS Unemployment
Kansas Unemployment Eligibility
Kentucky KY Unemployment
Kentucky Career Center: 
http://kentuckycareercenter.ky.gov/
Louisiana LA Unemployment
Louisiana Workforce Commission: 
http://www.laworks.net/
Maine ME Unemployment
State of Maine, Department of Labor: 
http://www.maine.gov/labor
Maryland MD Unemployment
Maryland Unemployment Benefits Eligibility
Massachusetts MA Unemployment
Massachusetts Unemployment Benefits Eligibility
Michigan MI Unemployment
Michigan Unemployment Answers

Minnesota MN Unemployment
Minnesota Unemployment Insurance Program
Mississippi MS Unemployment
Mississippi Unemployment Insurance Office: 
http://www.mdes.ms.gov/
Missouri MO Unemployment
Missouri Unemployment Eligibility and Guidelines
Montana MT Unemployment
Montana Department of Labor and Industry: 
http://uid.dli.mt.gov/
Nebraska NE Unemployment
Nebraska Department of Labor: 
https://neworks.nebraska.gov
Nevada NV Unemployment
Nevada NV Unemployment Eligibility
New Hampshire NH Unemployment
New Hampshire Employment Security: 
http://www.nhes.nh.gov/services/claimants
New Jersey NJ Unemployment
New Jersey Unemployment Eligibility
New Mexico NM Unemployment
New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions: 
http://www.dws.state.nm.us
New York NY Unemployment
New York State (NYS) Unemployment Eligibility, Explained.
North Carolina NC Unemployment
North Carolina (NC) Unemployment Eligibility Guidelines
North Dakota ND Unemployment
Job Service North Dakota: 
http://www.jobsnd.com/unemployment-for-individuals
Ohio OH Unemployment
Ohio Unemployment Eligibility
Oklahoma OK Unemployment
Oklahoma Unemployment Benefits and Eligibility
Oregon OR Unemployment
Oregon Unemployment Eligibility
Pennsylvania PA Unemployment
Pennsylvania Unemployment Program Requirements
Rhode Island RI Unemployment
Rhode Island Carolina Department of Labor and Training: 
http://www.dlt.ri.gov/ui/
South Carolina SC Unemployment
Guide to South Carolina Unemployment Eligibility
South Dakota SD Unemployment
South Dakota Department of Labor and Regulation: 
http://dlr.sd.gov/ui/uibenefits.aspx
Tennessee TN Unemployment 
Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development: 
http://www.tn.gov/workforce/section/unemployment
Texas TX Unemployment
Texas Unemployment Eligibility Help
Utah UT Unemployment
Utah Unemployment Eligibility and Benefits
Vermont VT Unemployment
Virginia Employment Commission: 
http://www.vec.virginia.gov/unemployed
Virginia VA Unemployment
Virginia Employment Commission: 
http://www.vec.virginia.gov/unemployed
Washington WA Unemployment
Washington Unemployment Benefits Eligibility
West Virginia WV Unemployment
Workforce West Virginia: 
http://www.wvcommerce.org/business/workforcewv/unemployment_compensation/default.aspx
Wisconsin WI Unemployment
Wisconsin WI Unemployment Eligibility Help
Wyoming WY Unemployment
Wyoming Department of Workforce Services:
http://www.wyomingworkforce.org/workers/ui/

What if I was denied unemployment benefits?

If your unemployment benefit application was denied, it is because the state agency found you ineligible for benefits. Most likely causes of ineligibility include:

  • You quit your job voluntarily. If you can show extenuating circumstances for quitting, you may still be eligible for benefits. It is up to the state to determine whether your reasons for quitting were good enough.
  • You were fired for misconduct. Your employer must divulge the reason(s) you were fired; if these reasons meet the state’s definition of misconduct, you will be denied benefits. 
  • You didn’t have adequate work or earnings during the base period. 
  • You didn’t meet the ongoing requirements. Even if your claim is initially approved, you must comply with the terms of the unemployment benefits. If, for example, you are unable to work for whatever reason, or are not actively seeking work, your benefits will be halted.
  • If you feel your unemployment claim was unfairly denied, you have a right to appeal that decision. 

How can I get my unemployment benefits extended?

According to the Department of Labor, Extended Benefits are available to workers who have exhausted regular unemployment insurance benefits during periods of high unemployment. The basic Extended Benefits program provides up to 13 additional weeks of benefits when a state is experiencing high unemployment. Some States have also enacted a voluntary program to pay up to 7 additional weeks (20 weeks maximum) of Extended Benefits during periods of extremely high unemployment. Not everyone who qualified for regular benefits will qualify for Extended Benefits. When a state begins an Extended Benefit period, it notifies those who have received all of their regular benefits that they may be eligible for Extended Benefits. You may contact the State Unemployment Insurance agency to ask whether Extended Benefits are available.

Are unemployment benefits taxable?

If you ever suspected the IRS of having a heart, you’d be wrong. Unemployment benefits are indeed considered taxable income. If you received unemployment compensation during the year, you must include it in gross income on your tax return. You should receive a Form 1099-G, Certain Government Payments, showing the amount of unemployment compensation paid to you during the year. 

If the amount you receive is small enough, you may not have enough taxable income to pay taxes. If you do expect your income to be taxable, you can choose to have federal income tax withheld. You simply need to fill out Form W-4V, Voluntary Withholding Request. 

In addition, most states that have an income tax treat unemployment compensation the same way that the federal government does, and you are required to include unemployment benefits in your taxable income for state income tax purposes. 

What about partial unemployment benefits?

If you are still working, but are “underemployed,” you may be eligible for partial unemployment benefits. As usual, your state will determine whether partial benefits are available to you, but in general the following requirements must be met:

  • Through no fault of your own, your hours or pay have been cut, or you have been forced to take a part-time position and you can't get additional work. Some states may allow benefits if you were working more than one part time job and lost one of those jobs. 
  • You meet your state's minimum earnings and minimum hours worked during the base period. These requirements are the same whether you apply for regular or partial unemployment benefits.
  • You are available and willing to work more than you are currently, and are actively seeking full time employment.

Most states will calculate the amount of your benefit by first determining what you would be entitled to if you were fully unemployed. The amount you are earning through part-time employment will be subtracted from this figure. Most states reserve a percentage, some as much as 25%, of the part-time pay that is subtracted, allowing you to keep that amount on top of the benefit you would receive if you weren’t working. This works as an incentive for you to pursue any temporary or part time work that you are able to get. 

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Are unemployment benefits delayed on holidays?

Sometimes. Depending on the state, and on how they disburse your benefits (e.g. directly deposited into bank accounts or loaded onto the debit cards of unemployed workers), it is possible for there to be a one or two day delay before the benefits are available.

Are unemployment benefits paid weekly?

Unemployment insurance claims are considered on a weekly basis, and you will receive benefits only for the weeks that you meet eligibility requirements. Many states do pay benefits weekly, but some will disburse payment every other week. Occasionally a lump sum payment will be made, for example in the case of an appeal, where back payment for previous eligible weeks will be made.

Are unemployment benefits public record?

No. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, unemployment compensation (UC) information collected and maintained for the administration of the UC program is confidential and, with a few exceptions, are not subject to disclosure. Law enforcement officials, under certain conditions, may have access to unemployment records, as well as some governmental entities, including food stamp agencies and child support enforcement agencies. 

Can I obtain a loan while collecting unemployment benefits?

Unfortunately, a period of unemployment is a tough time to get a loan. Most creditors are looking for applicants who are gainfully employed and who have a good credit history. However, if you are unemployed and collecting unemployment benefits, it might still be possible to get a loan. 

  • If you are a homeowner, and you have a sufficient amount of equity in your home, a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) could be an option. This is a type of loan that resembles having a credit card with a revolving balance. Talk to your bank or mortgage lender for advice.
  • A friend or family member who is in a stable financial situation may be willing to co-sign a loan, giving you a better chance of securing a loan and potentially a larger loan. 
  • Many credit cards offer cash advances. It's a quick way to get cash, but be aware that the interest rate is usually high.
  • A car title loan is an easy, if expensive, option if you have a car that is already paid for, or if what you owe on it is less than what it’s worth. Interest is generally high and often a fee will be charged (on top of the interest), for accepting the loan. 
  • A debt consolidation loan can reduce your total monthly payments and help you avoid creditors, get lower interest rates, and end late fees. A non-profit credit counseling program may be able to help you.
  • Short-term Installment / Payday Loans should be an absolute last resort. They are very expensive in terms of interest and fees, and can lead to a cycle of debt that can be nearly impossible to climb out of. 

Why are my unemployment benefits taking so long to arrive?

When you lose your job, it is frustrating to have to wait for your unemployment benefits to kick in. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, processing takes about two to three weeks for most applicants. 

To avoid any extra delay in benefit payments, be sure to fill out your application correctly. Inaccurate or incomplete information can delay benefit payments. Answer each question honestly and completely. Verify that your employment and earnings information is reported correctly. 

Especially, be truthful in explaining why you are out of a job. If your former employer disputes your claim, your benefits may be held for several weeks until your case is resolved. Be sure to continue filing a weekly claim. If the dispute is resolved in your favor, you will receive back payments.

One other factor is the method of payment you choose to receive. Opt to have funds disbursed via direct deposit or through a state-issued debit card. Paper checks usually take an extra day or two to arrive and are less secure, as they can be lost or delayed in the mail. 

Why do unemployment benefits have to end?

Unemployment benefits provide a safety net for workers who are laid off from their jobs, until they can get work again. They are not meant to be a permanent solution. If unemployment benefits did not expire, there would be far less incentive for unemployed workers to look for jobs, and the taxes paid to fund the program would become too onerous to maintain.

Unfortunately, sometimes even with diligent effort, a person may remain unemployed after their regular and/or extended unemployment benefits end. If that happens to you, you will need to redouble your efforts to find a job. If it has not been up to now, your full-time job should be to find a new job. You might consider moving to a new city or state with more opportunities for work. 

If you cannot support yourself or your family without assistance, there are still other government programs you may qualify for including Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP--AKA Food Stamps), Medicaid, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF--AKA Welfare), or other social service programs.

Remember that there are also many community and church-sponsored relief programs, including food banks, soup kitchens, and employment counseling, that are available. Your local library or community center should be able to help you find assistance in your area.

Who pays unemployment benefits?

Unemployment benefits are issued by each state’s unemployment office. The benefits are funded by businesses, who pay taxes for this purpose. Most employers pay both a federal and a state unemployment tax. 

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Our Unemployment Insurance Ultimate Guide

Overview

If you lose your job and it’s not your fault, chances are you are eligible to receive unemployment benefits through the Department of Labor's (USDOL) Unemployment Insurance (UI) programs. Unemployment benefits are used to help workers who lost their jobs by no fault of their own. Benefits are not based on financial need. To file for unemployment, you must be ready and willing to work and have worked in the last 18 months.

Each state runs its own unemployment program under rules set by the USDOL, so program guidelines, including eligibility requirements and benefits, vary from state to state. When you make a UI claim, your benefits will be calculated under the guidelines of the state where the claim is made.

Becoming unemployed through no fault of your own includes situations like being laid off because a company has closed or there is not enough work for you to do. If a worker quits or is fired they are not usually eligible for unemployment benefits.

Unemployment benefits claims are often denied for these reasons:

  • You are not available to work
  • You quit your job
  • You were fired
  • You refuse suitable work
  • Your unemployment resulted from a labor dispute

If an employee and employer disagree about the reason the employee was let go, a state official will determine if the employee is eligible. If you believe you have wrongfully been denied benefits, you have the right to appeal. This can be done through the State Unemployment Insurance Agency (see State Program information below) where your claim was made.

Benefits

In general, you will receive your first benefit check two to three weeks after filing your claim.. 

Unemployment benefit amount in each state will vary. Budget and number of people currently receiving benefits dictate how much the state can afford to pay in benefits each week.

Weekly benefit amount ranges from $5 and $900 per week, depending on your state, income history and any additional income you have currently. Many people receive between $200 and $400 a week.

Most states pay unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks. Exceptions to this rule are:

State
Maximum weeks of benefits
Florida
19
Georgia
18
Massachusetts
30
Michigan
20
Missouri
20
Montana
28
North Carolina
19
South Carolina
20

Base Period

To receive benefits, you need to meet requirements for income earned and hours worked during what is called a base period. The base period is the most recent four out of the last five full calendar quarters before your claim is filed in most states. For example, if you file a claim in April 2015, the base period used to calculate eligibility would be January 2014 through December 2014.

Date of Claim
Base Period
Jan-Mar
Oct-Dec [2 years previous], Jan-Sept [previous year]
April-June
Jan-Dec [previous year]
July-Sept
April-Dec [previous year], Jan-March [current year]
Oct-Dec
July-Dec [previous year], Jan-June [current year]

Alternate Base Period

If you don't qualify for benefits based on the standard base period, many states have an alternate base period you can use to qualify. This period is usually the 4 most recent calendar quarters before the claim is filed.

Filing a Claim

Contact your State Unemployment Insurance Agency (see State Program information below) as soon as you become unemployed. Most offices prefer claims to be done online, although some may accept claims via telephone or mail. Computers with Internet access are available free of charge to file claims at the State Unemployment Insurance Agency or American Job Center near you. Most local libraries also offer free Internet access.

When filing your claims, you should have the following information handy:

  • Name, address, telephone
  • Social security number
     OR
     Alien Registration card number
  • Driver’s license or ID card number (if you have it)
  • 18 months of employment history:
  • Names/addresses of former employer(s)
  • Employment dates
  • Most recent employers’ Employer Registration number or Federal Employer Identification Number (if you have it)

Make sure the information you give is correct to help the claims process go as smoothly as possible, and helps ensure that your claim is not denied.

You should file your claim with the state where you were employed. However, if you no longer live in that state or worked in multiple states, contact your local state agency for help with filing.

Continuing Benefits

To continue receiving benefits, you must: 

  • File weekly or biweekly claims.
  • Answer questions to show you are still eligible.
  • Report any earnings and job offers.
  • Report to your local State Unemployment Insurance Agency or One-Stop/Employment Service Office when you are scheduled to.
  • Report for all scheduled interviews.

If you do not follow the rules above, benefits will be stopped.

Finding Work

All job seekers can utilize a local American Job Center (also known as a One-Stop Career Center) for help with their job search. These offices can refer you to open positions and job training programs, assist with résumé writing and interview preparation, help you explore different career paths and much more. All services are all given free of charge. Some states require you to register with your American Job Center in order to receive benefits.

To find one nearest you, visit the American Job Center or contact your State Unemployment Insurance Agency.

Fraud

Unemployment Insurance fraud is not taken lightly. It is important to provide correct information when filing your initial and weekly claims in order to avoid committing fraud. Intentionally providing wrong information about yourself or someone else is considered a crime and you can be held legally responsible.

False information is most commonly submitted in the following areas:

Personal Information: Your unemployment benefits application becomes a legal document upon submission. By law, you are expected to give your current and correct name, social security number, address, phone number and employment information. Using someone else’s (including a family member’s) information to apply for unemployment is considered identity theft.

Looking for Work: In order to receive unemployment benefits, most recipients are required to actively seek work and be physically and mentally able to work. Each week, you are asked to confirm this status in your weekly claim. You are committing fraud if you are not looking for work, lie about looking for work or lie about being able to work.

Reporting Income: While receiving unemployment benefits you are required by law to report all income earned when making your weekly claim. This includes any income from a part-time job, freelance work, consulting, etc. This information is used when calculating your benefits and you will receive a prorated payment based on your weekly income. Not reporting additional income while you are receiving unemployment benefits is a crime.

State Programs

Alabama

Alabama State Unemployment Office: AL Alabama Unemployment Office Locations

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Alabama Department of Labor: http://www.labor.alabama.gov

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify):

  • Average of 2 highest base period quarters is at least $1157.01.
  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $45-$265

File a claim:
 
Online: https://labor.alabama.gov/uc/ICCS/
 
Phone: 1-866-234-5382

Contact: 1-800-361-4524

Alaska

Alaska State Unemployment Office: AK Alaska Unemployment Office Locations

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development: http://labor.alaska.gov/unemployment/

Minimum earnings to qualify: $2,500 OR earned at least $1,157.01 during 2 quarters of the base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $56-$370
 See calculator: http://labor.alaska.gov/unemployment/Calculating_Benefits.pdf

File a claim: Online: https://my.alaska.gov

Contact:

Anchorage UI Claim Center
PO Box 107224
Anchorage, Alaska 99510
(907) 269-4700
(907) 269-4853 Fax
auicc@alaska.gov
Juneau UI Claim Center
PO Box 115509
Juneau, AK 99811-5509
(907) 465-5552
(907) 465-5573 Fax
juicc@alaska.gov
Fairbanks UI Claim Center
675 Seventh Ave., Station M
Fairbanks, AK 99701
(907) 451-2871
(907) 451-2870 Fax
fuicc@alaska.gov

Arizona

Arizona State Unemployment Office: AZ Arizona Unemployment Office Locations

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Arizona Department of Economic Security: https://www.azdes.gov/landing.aspx?id=4211

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $4,709.25

  • Earned at least 390 times the Arizona minimum wage ($3139.50) in your highest earning quarter of the base period.
  • Total earned in 3 other quarters equals is at least ½ of the amount earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $126-$240
 See table: https://www.azdes.gov/main.aspx?menu=317&id=4245

File a claim: Online: https://extranet.azdes.gov/ders/ea/uiclaims/

Contact:

Arkansas

Arkansas State Unemployment Office: AR Arkansas Unemployment Office Locations

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Arkansas Department of Workforce Services: http://www.arkansas.gov/esd/UI/index.htm   

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,835

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Wages earned during the base period must be at least 35 times the weekly benefit amount.

Weekly benefit amount: $81-$451

File a claim: Online: https://www.ezarc.adws.arkansas.gov/

Contact: 1-855-225-4400 or ADWS.Info@arkansas.gov or your Department of Workforce Services Local Office

California

California State Unemployment Office: CA California Unemployment Office Locations

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Employment Development Department (EDD): http://www.edd.ca.gov/

Minimum earnings to qualify:

Earned at least $1,300 during one quarter of the base period.

OR

  • Earned at least $900 in the first quarter of the base period AND
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $40-$450
 See table: http://www.edd.ca.gov/pdf_pub_ctr/de1101bt5.pdf

File a claim:
 
Online: https://eapply4ui.edd.ca.gov.
 Phone:

English: 1-800-300-5616

Spanish: 1-800-326-8937

Chinese (Cantonese): 1-800-547-3506

Chinese (Mandarin): 1-866-303-0706

Vietnamese: 1-800-547-2058

Mail or Fax: A paper application is available at https://eapply4ui.edd.ca.gov. The application can be completed online and printed, or printed and completed by hand then be faxed or mailed, with proper postage, to the EDD:

EDD

P.O. Box 12906

Oakland, CA 94604-2906

Fax Number: 1-866-215-9159

Contact: http://www.edd.ca.gov/unemployment/Contact_UI.htm

Colorado

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Colorado Department of Labor and Employment: https://www.colorado.gov/cdle/unemployment 

Minimum earnings to qualify: $2,500

Weekly benefit amount: $25-$502
 Estimate your benefits: http://www.coworkforce.com/uibEstimator/

File a claim: Online: https://smartfile.coworkforce.com/Start

Contact:

  • Toll free: 1-800-388-5515
  • 303-318-9000
  • Spanish: 303-318-9333
  • Spanish toll free: 1-866-422-0402

Connecticut

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Connecticut Department of Labor: http://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/HP/UIServices.htm

Minimum earnings to qualify: $600

  • Earned at least 40 times your weekly benefit rate during the base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $15-$594
 Estimate your benefits: http://www.coworkforce.com/uibEstimator/

File a claim:
 Online: https://sso.ctdol.state.ct.us/English/CommonLogin/CommonLogin.aspx Phone: http://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/progsupt/unemplt/tele-benphone.htm

Contact: 860-263-6785 or dol.webhelp@ct.gov

Delaware

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 State of Delaware, Division of Unemployment Insurance: http://ui.delawareworks.com/

Minimum earnings to qualify: $720

  • Earned at least 36 times your weekly benefit amount.

Weekly benefit amount: $20-$330

File a claim: Online: https://uics.delawareworks.com/Forms/Form_WL1.aspx

Contact:

  • New Castle County residents: 302-761-6576
  • Kent & Sussex County residents: 800-794-3032

District of Columbia

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 DC Department of Employment Services: http://does.dc.gov/page/unemployment-compensation

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,950

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least $1,300 in wages in 1 quarter of the base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter or be within $70 of that amount.

Weekly benefit amount: $50-$350

File a claim:
 Online: https://does.dcnetworks.org/initialclaims/
 Phone: 202-724-7000

Contact: 202-724-7000 or 1-877-319-7346

Florida

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Florida Department of Economic Opportunity: http://www.floridajobs.org/job-seekers-community-services

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $3,400

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $32-$275
 To estimate, use the quarter in the base period with the highest earnings and divide the earnings by 26.

File a claim: Online: https://connect.myflorida.com/Claimant/Core/Login.ASPX

Contact: Call 800-204-2418 or email: http://www.floridajobs.org/applications/uccontactus/

Georgia

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Georgia Department of Labor: http://www.floridajobs.org/job-seekers-community-services

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,268

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least $1,134 in the two highest earning quarters of the base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $44-$330

File a claim: Online: https://www.dol.state.ga.us/WS4-MW5/cics.jsp?TRANSID=UCI1&FRMNAME=UCI1S

Contact: Email the Georgia Department of Labor at http://dol.georgia.gov/email-us or contact your local career center: http://dol.georgia.gov/locations/career-center

Hawaii

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 State of Hawaii, Department of Labor and Industrial Relations: http://labor.hawaii.gov/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $130

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least 26 times your weekly benefit amount.

Weekly benefit amount: $5-$551
 Benefits estimator: https://huiclaims2.hawaii.gov/UI_ClaimWEB/pages/calculator/calculator.jsf
 To estimate, divide your highest quarter base period wages by 21.

File a claim: Online: https://huiclaims.hawaii.gov

File online during these times only:

  • Monday through Friday: 6:30 a.m. - 11 p.m.
  • Weekends and Holidays: 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

Contact: Email dlir.unemployment@hawaii.gov or contact the Claims & Benefits office near you: http://labor.hawaii.gov/ui/contact/.

Idaho

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Idaho Department of Labor: http://labor.idaho.gov/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,340

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least $1,872 in your highest quarter of the base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $72-$398

File a claim: Online: http://labor.idaho.gov/IW/UIClaim/Main.asp?strMenu=FILECLAIM

Contact: New and existing claims: 208-332-8942

Illinois

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
Illinois Unemployment Help

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,600

  • Earned at least $1,134 in the base period.
  • Earned a total of at least $400 during your 3 lowest base period quarters.

Weekly benefit amount: $51-$580
 See table: http://www.ides.illinois.gov/IDES%20Forms%20and%20Publications/CLI110L.pdf

File a claim: Online: http://labor.idaho.gov/IW/UIClaim/Main.asp?strMenu=FILECLAIM

Contact: Call 1-800-244-5631 or find a local IDES office at http://www.ides.illinois.gov/Pages/Office_Locator.aspx.

Indiana

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Indiana Department of Workforce Development: http://www.in.gov/dwd/2334.htm 

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $4,200

  • Earned at least $2,500 in the last 6 months of the base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $50-$390
 To estimate, divide total wages earned in the base period by 52, then multiply the sum by 0.47and round to the nearest dollar.

File a claim:
 Online: https://uplink.in.gov/CSS/CSSLogon.htm
 In-person: Visit your nearest WorkOne Center—http://www.in.gov/dwd/WorkOne/

Contact:

  • Phone: 1-800-891-6499
  • Web Chat: http://www.in.gov/dwd/2764.htm
  • Mail: Indiana Department of Workforce Development
  • Indiana Government Center South
  • 10 North Senate Avenue
  • Indianapolis, IN 46204

Iowa

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Iowa Workforce Development: https://www.iowaworkforcedevelopment.gov/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,150

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least $1,430 in one and $720 in another quarter of the base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $62-$529
 To estimate, the highest earning quarter of your base period is divided by:

  • 23 for zero dependents (maximum of $431)
  • 22 for one dependent (maximum of $447)
  • 21 for two dependents (maximum of $463)
  • 20 for three dependents (maximum of $488)
  • 19 for four dependents (maximum of $529)

File a claim:
 Online: https://uiclaims.iwd.iowa.gov/UIInitialClaim/
 In-person: Visit your nearest IowaWorks Center— https://www.iowaworkforcedevelopment.gov/iowaworks-centers

Contact: 1-866-239-0843.

Kansas

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Kansas Department of Labor: http://www.dol.ks.gov/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $3,510

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least 30 times your weekly benefit amount.

Weekly benefit amount: $117-$469
 See calculator: https://www.getkansasbenefits.gov/Home.aspx

File a claim:
 Online: https://www.getkansasbenefits.gov/BenefitsStartMenu.aspx

Contact: 785-291-6100

Kentucky

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Kentucky Career Center: http://kentuckycareercenter.ky.gov/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,500

  • Earned at least $750 in one quarter of the base period.
  • Earned a total of at least $750 during your 3 lowest base period quarters.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.
  • Total wages earned in the last 2 quarters must be at least 8 times your weekly benefit rate.

Weekly benefit amount: $39-$415
 See calculator: http://kentuckycareercenter.ky.gov/career/WuiCalculator.aspx

File a claim:
 Online: https://uiclaims.des.ky.gov/ebenefit/
 Phone: 502-875-0442

Contact: Find an office near you: http://kentuckycareercenter.ky.gov/Office/Locations.aspx

Louisiana

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Louisiana Workforce Commission: http://www.laworks.net/Homepage.asp/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,200

  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $10-$247

File a claim:
 Online: https://www.louisianaworks.net/hire/vosnet/registration/ind/uiclaim.aspx Phone: 1-866-783-5567

Contact: 1-866-783-5567

Maine

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 State of Maine, Department of Labor: http://www.maine.gov/labor

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $4583.22

  • Earned at least 2 times the annual average weekly wage in Maine in 2 quarters during the base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 6 times the annual average weekly wage in Maine.

Weekly benefit amount: Maximum: $397
 To estimate, divide the average of your 2 highest quarter wages by 22.

File a claim:
 Online: https://labor.informe.org/cgi-bin/unemployment/start
 Phone: 1-800-593-7660

Contact: 1-800-593-7660

Maryland

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation: http://www.dllr.state.md.us/employment/unemployment.shtml

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,764

  • Earned at least $1,176 in one quarter of your base period.
  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $50-$430
 If you worked full-time during all 4 quarters, your weekly benefit amount will be approximately 1/2 of your gross weekly wage up to the maximum weekly benefit amount.

File a claim:
 Online: https://secure-2.dllr.state.md.us/NetClaims/Welcome.aspx
 Phone:

UI Claim Center
Phone Number to File a Claim
Areas Served
Baltimore Metro South Claim Center
410-368-5300
 1-877-293-4125
 (toll free in MD only)
Baltimore City
Anne Arundel County
Howard County
College Park Claim Center
301-313-8000
 1-877-293-4125
 (toll free in MD only)
Calvert County
Charles County
Montgomery County
Prince Georges County
St. Mary's County
Cumberland Claim Center
301-723-2000
 1-877-293-4125
 (toll free in MD only)
Allegany County
Frederick County
Garrett County
Washington County)
Salisbury Claim Center
410-334-6800
 1-877-293-4125
 (toll free in MD only)
Caroline County
Dorchester County
Kent County
Queen Anne's County
Somerset County
Talbot County
Wicomico County
Worcester County
Towson Claim Center
410-853-1600
 1-877-293-4125
 (toll free in MD only)
Baltimore County
Carroll County
Cecil County
Harford County)


Contact:

  • Baltimore area or out of state: 410 - 949 - 0022
  • Maryland, outside of the Baltimore area: 1-800-827-4839

Massachusetts

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Massachusetts Labor and Workforce Development: http://www.mass.gov/lwd/unemployment-insur/

Minimum earnings to qualify (meet all to qualify): $3,500

  • Earned at least 30 times your weekly benefit amount.

Weekly benefit amount: $67 - $698
 Calculate your benefits: http://www.mass.gov/lwd/unemployment-insur/basic-ui-information/initial-claim/how-your-benefits-are-determined/calculating-benefit-rate.html

File a claim:
 Online: http://www.mass.gov/lwd/unemployment-insur/claimants/
 Phone:

  • Area codes: 351, 413, 508, 774, and 978: 1-877-626-6800
  • All others: 617-626-6800

Contact:

Michigan

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Michigan Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 http://www.michigan.gov/uia

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $4,743 

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: Maximum: $362

File a claim:
 Online: https://miwam.unemployment.state.mi.us/mip/webdoc/_/#1
 Phone: 1-866-500-0017

Contact: 1-866-500-0017

Minnesota

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Minnesota Unemployment Insurance Program: http://www.uimn.org/uimn/


 Minimum earnings 
(meet all to qualify): $2,400

Earned at least $2400 during the base period.

 OR

Earned 5.3% of the state’s average annual wage, rounded down to the nearest $100, during the base period. 

Weekly benefit amount: $38-$640
 Benefits calculator: https://www1.uimn.org/ui_applicant/benefits/monetary/premonetary/calculatePremonetary.do?init=true&action.calculatePremonetary.initApplicant.null=true

File a claim:
 Online: http://www.uimn.org/uimn/applicants/howapply/application-process/index.jsp
 Phone:

  • Greater Minnesota: 1-877-898-9090
  • Twin Cities area: 651-296-3644

Contact:

  • Greater Minnesota: 1-877-898-9090
  • Twin Cities area: 651-296-3644

Mississippi

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Mississippi Unemployment Insurance Office: http://www.mdes.ms.gov/

Minimum earnings to qualify (meet all to qualify): $1,200

Earned at least $780.00 in one quarter of your base period.

Earned 40 times your weekly benefit amount in your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $148-$320

See table: http://mdes.ms.gov/unemployment-claims/benefit-information/weekly-benefit-amounts/

To estimate, divide the total wages earned in your highest base period quarter by 26.

File a claim: Online: http://www.mdes.ms.gov/unemployment-claims/

Contact:

Toll free: 1-888-844-3577

Jackson: (601) 321-6000

Kansas City: (816) 889-3101

Springfield: (417) 895-6851

Jefferson City: (573) 751-9040

St. Louis: (314) 340-4950

comments@mdes.ms.gov

Missouri 

Unemployment Insurance Agency: 

Department of Labor and Industrial Relations: http://www.labor.mo.gov

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,500

  • Earned at least $1,500 during one quarter of your base period.
  • Earned at least $750 during the remaining 3 quarters of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

OR

Earned at least $19,500 during two of the four base period quarters.

Weekly benefit amount: $45-$320
 Benefits calculator: http://labor.mo.gov/DES/Claims/calculator

File a claim:
 Online: https://www.ui.labor.mo.gov/som/
 Phone:

  • Toll Free: 1-800-320-2519
  • Jefferson City: 573-751-9040
  • Kansas City: 816-889-3101
  • Springfield: 417-895-6851
  • St. Louis: 314-340-4950

Contact:

Montana

Unemployment Insurance Agency: 

Montana Department of Labor and Industry: http://uid.dli.mt.gov/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,786

  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.
  • Total wages earned during base period must be at least 7% of the state’s average annual wage.

     OR

     Total wages earned during base period must be at least 50% of the state’s average annual wage.

Weekly benefit amount: $134-$471
 Calculate your benefits: http://uid.dli.mt.gov/benefits-estimator

File a claim:
 Online: https://app.mt.gov/ui4u/index

Contact: 1-406-444-3783 or ui4u@mt.gov

Nebraska

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Nebraska Department of Labor: https://neworks.nebraska.gov

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $4094.89

  • Earned at least $1,850 in one quarter of your base period.
  • Earned at least $800 in another quarter of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $71-$380
 To estimate, divide wages earned in the highest quarter of your base period by by 13 then divide that amount by two and round down to the nearest dollar.

File a claim:
 Online: https://neworks.nebraska.gov/vosnet/Default.aspx
 Phone: 402-458-2500

Contact: 402-471-9000 or email https://dol.nebraska.gov/ContactUs

Nevada

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation: http://ui.nv.gov

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $600

  • Earned at least $400 in one quarter of your base period.
     AND
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.
     OR
  • Earned wages in 3 of the 4 quarters of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $16-$407
 To estimate, divide highest quarter earnings by 25.

File a claim:
 Online: http://ui.nv.gov/home.htm
 Phone:

  • Northern Nevada: 775-684-0350
  • Southern Nevada: 702-486-0350

Contact:

  • Northern Nevada: 775-684-0350
  • Southern Nevada: 702-486-0350

New Hampshire

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

New Hampshire Employment Security: http://www.nhes.nh.gov/services/claimants

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,800

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $32-$427

File a claim:
 Online: http://www.nhes.nh.gov/services/claimants/file.htm

Contact: 1-800-852-3400 or 603-224-3311

New Jersey

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

State of New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development: http://lwd.dol.state.nj.us/labor/ui/ui_index.html 

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $3,300

  • Earned wages during at least 20 weeks of the base period.
  • Earned at least $165 per week worked.
  • OR

Earned at least $8,300 during the base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $99-$636
 Benefits estimator: http://lwd.state.nj.us/uiapp/Start.html

File a claim:
 Online: https://njsuccess.dol.state.nj.us/njsuccess/html/fileAClaimHome.htm

Phone:

  • Northeast New Jersey: 201-601-4100
  • Northwest and Central New Jersey: 732-761-2020
  • South Jersey: 856-507-2340
  • Out-of-state: 888-795-6672

Contact: 1-877-664-6984

New Mexico

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions: http://www.dws.state.nm.us

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,871.03

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $74-$397

File a claim:
 Online: http://www.dws.state.nm.us/Unemployment-Insurance/UI-Tax-Claims-System/NM-Workforce-Connection-UI-System

Phone: 1-877-664-6984

Contact: 1-877-664-6984

New York

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

New York State, Department of Labor: http://www.labor.state.ny.us/unemploymentassistance.shtm

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,400

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least $1,600 in one quarter of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $100-$420
 To estimate, divide wages earned during the highest quarter of your base period by 26

File a claim:
 Online: https://applications.labor.ny.gov/IndividualReg

Phone:

  • New York State residents: 1-888-209-8124
  • Out-of-state residents: 1-877-358-5306

Contact: 919-212-5706

North Carolina

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

North Carolina Department of Commerce, Division of Employment Security: http://www.jobsnd.com/unemployment-for-individuals

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $780

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least $780 in the 2 most recent quarters of you base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $15-$350
 To estimate, divide your total of wages in the last two quarters of your base period by 52, then round down to the nearest dollar.

File a claim:
 Online: https://desncc.com/IIC/Home/BeginApp

Contact: 919-212-5706

North Dakota

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Job Service North Dakota: http://www.jobsnd.com/unemployment-for-individuals

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,795

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $43-$594
 Your approximate weekly benefit amount will be the total of your highest 2½ quarters of base period earnings divided by 65.

File a claim:
 Online: https://apps.nd.gov/jsnd/uiiaclaims/login.htm
 
Phone: 701-328-4995

Contact: 701-328-4995 or email at https://www.jobsnd.com/form/benefit-payment-control-bpc-fraud-detection-and-prevention-unit

Ohio

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Ohio Department of Job and Family Services: https://unemployment.ohio.gov/PublicSelfServiceChoice.html

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $4,470

  • Earned wages during 20 weeks of your base period.
  • Earned an average of at least $237 per week during your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $118-$572
 Estimate your benefits: http://jfs.ohio.gov/unemp_comp_faq/faq_elig_definitions4.stm

File a claim:
 Online: http://jfs.ohio.gov/ouc/ClaimInformationPage.stm 
 
Phone: 1-877-644-6562

Contact: 1-877-644-6562 or OJI@odjfs.state.oh.us

Oklahoma

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Oklahoma Employment Security Commission: http://www.ok.gov/oesc_web/index.html

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,500

  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $16-$490
 To estimate, divide your highest quarter base period wages by 23.

File a claim:
 Online: https://unemployment.state.ok.us/instructions.asp?x=n 
 
Phone: 405-525-1500 or 1-800-555-1554

Contact: 405-557-7190 or OESCHelps@oesc.state.ok.us

Oregon

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

State of Oregon, Employment Department: http://www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Pages/default.aspx

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,000

Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

OR

Worked at least 500 hours during the base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $126-$538
 Your weekly benefit amount is 1.25% of your total base period wages.

File a claim:
 Online: https://ssl8.emp.state.or.us/ocs4/index.cfm?u=F20150917A201843B81149794.971&lang=E 
 
Phone: 1-877-345-3484

Contact: 1-800-237-3710 or 503-947-1394

Pennsylvania

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry: http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/pennsylvania_unemployment_compensation_%E2%80%93_www_uc_pa_gov/11449

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $3,391

  • Earned at least $1,688 in one quarter of your base period.
  • Earned at least $100 during 18 weeks your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $70-$573
 Your weekly benefit amount is typically about half of what your full-time wage was before you became unemployed.

File a claim:
 Online: https://www.paclaims.state.pa.us/UCEN/Welcome.asp 
 
Phone: 1-888-313-7284

Contact: 1-888-313-7284

Rhode Island

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Rhode Island Carolina Department of Labor and Training: http://www.dlt.ri.gov/ui/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $3,600

  • Earned at least $1,800 in one quarter of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $46-$566
 Your weekly benefit rate will be equal to 3.85% of the average of the wages earned in the two highest quarters of the base period, not to exceed the maximum amount. If you have dependent children under 18 years of age you may be entitled to a dependency allowance.

File a claim:
 Online: http://www.sces.org/claim-guide.asp#FileClaim
 
Phone: 401-243-9100

Contact: 401-462-8000

South Carolina

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce: http://dew.sc.gov/claim-land.asp

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $4,455

  • Earned at least $1,092 in one quarter of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $42-$326
 Benefits estimator: http://dew.sc.gov/claim-weekly-benefit-amount.asp

File a claim:
 Online: http://www.sces.org/claim-guide.asp#FileClaim

Contact: 1-866-831-1724 or 803-737-2400

South Dakota

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

South Dakota Department of Labor and Regulation: http://dlr.sd.gov/ui/uibenefits.aspx

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,288

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least $728 in one quarter of your base period.
  • Earned 20 times your weekly benefit amount in the 3 lowest earning quarters of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $28-$366
 To estimate, divide wages earned in your highest quarter by 26. The maximum amount payable in your benefit year is one-third your total base period wages, but not more than 26 times your weekly benefit.

File a claim:
 Online: http://dlr.sd.gov/ui/uibenefitsfilingclaim.aspx

Phone: 602-626-3179

Contact: 602-626-2301

Tennessee

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development: http://www.tn.gov/workforce/section/unemployment

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,560.02

  • Earned at least $780.01 in at least 2 quarters of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $30-$275
 Calculated as the lesser of ¼ of the your base period wages or 26 times the weekly benefit amount.

File a claim:
 Online: https://ui.tn.gov/

Contact: 1-844-224-5818

Texas

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Texas Workforce Commission: http://www.twc.state.tx.us/  

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,257

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 37 times your weekly benefit amount.

Weekly benefit amount: $64-$465
 Benefits estimator: https://apps.twc.state.tx.us/UBS/changeLocale.do?language=en&country=US&page=/benefitsEstimator.do
 To estimate, divide wages earned in your highest base period quarter by 25.

File a claim:
 Online: http://www.twc.state.tx.us/jobseekers/unemployment-benefits-services

Contact: 1- 800-939-6631

Utah

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Utah Department of Workforce Services: https://jobs.utah.gov/index.html 

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $3,300

  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $27-$496
 See estimator: https://jobs.utah.gov/ui/ContinuedClaims/Status/Premon.aspx

File a claim:
 Online: https://jobs.utah.gov/ui/InitialClaims/welcome.aspx

Contact:

  • Salt Lake and South Davis Counties: 801-526-4400
  • Weber and North Davis Counties: 801-612-0877
  • Utah County: 801-375-4067
  • Remainder of State and Out of State: 1-888-848-0688

Vermont

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Virginia Employment Commission: http://www.vec.virginia.gov/unemployed

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $3,291.40

  • Earned at least $2,351 in one quarter of your base period.
  • Earned a total of 40% of the wages earned in your highest quarter during the 3 other quarters of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $59-$436
 To estimate, divide the total wages earned in the two highest quarters of your base period by 45.

File a claim: Phone: 1-877-214-3330

Contact: 1-877-214-3330

Virginia

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Virginia Employment Commission: http://www.vec.virginia.gov/unemployed

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,700

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $54-$378

File a claim:
 Online: https://www.vec.virginiainteractive.org/cgi-bin/login.cgi
 Phone: 1-866-832-2363

Contact: Contact a Virginia Employment Commission office near you: http://www.vec.virginia.gov/find-a-job/vec-local-offices.

Washington

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Washington State Employment Security Department: https://esd.wa.gov/unemployment

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $6,439

  • Worked at least 680 hours during your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $158-$664
 See calculator: https://esd.wa.gov/unemployment/calculate-your-benefit

File a claim:
 Online: https://fortress.wa.gov/esd/webic/intropage.aspx?Lang=en-us
 Phone: 1-800-318-6022

Contact: Call 1-800-252-JOBS (5627) or email WorkforceUCProceduresUnit@wv.gov.

West Virginia

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

Workforce West Virginia: http://www.wvcommerce.org/business/workforcewv/unemployment_compensation/default.aspx 

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $2,200

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.

Weekly benefit amount: $24-$424
 See table: http://www.wvcommerce.org/business/workforcewv/unemployment_compensation/claimants/benefit_rates.aspx

File a claim:
 Online: https://uc.workforcewv.org/consumer/?AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1
 In-person: Visit a claims office near you: http://www.wvcommerce.org/business/workforcewv/unemployment_compensation/locations/default.aspx

Contact: Call 1-800-252-JOBS (5627) or email WorkforceUCProceduresUnit@wv.gov.

Wisconsin

Unemployment Insurance Agency:

State of Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development: http://dwd.wisconsin.gov/ui/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $1,890

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least $1350 in one quarter of your base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $54-$370
 See chart: http://dwd.wisconsin.gov/uiben/handbook/pdf/wbrchart.pdf

File a claim:
 Online: http://dwd.wisconsin.gov/uiben/online/
 Phone:

  • Madison area: 608-232-0678
  • Milwaukee area: 414-438-7700
  • Toll free: 1-800-822-5246

Contact:

  • Madison area: 608-232-0678
  • Milwaukee area: 414-438-7700
  • Toll free: 1-800-822-5246

Wyoming

Unemployment Insurance Agency:
 Wyoming Department of Workforce Services: http://www.wyomingworkforce.org/workers/ui/

Minimum earnings (meet all to qualify): $3594.40

  • Earned wages in at least 2 quarters of your base period.
  • Earned at least 8% of Wyoming’s average annual wage (rounded to the nearest $50) during the base period.
  • Total earned during base period must be at least 1.5 times the wages earned in your highest quarter.

Weekly benefit amount: $34-$475

File a claim:
 Online: https://doe.state.wy.us/InetClaims/
 Phone: 307-473-3789

Contact: 307-473-3789