Questions You May Be Asked During a Family-Based Green Card Interview

Calendar Icon Updated January 15, 2019
Green Cards

A Green Card interview is the final and most important step in becoming a lawful permanent resident of the United States. The type of questions you will be asked during the interview will depend on the type of Green Card you are seeking. 

All interviews start by having the questioner asking the petitioner to take an oath, swearing to tell “the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.” Failing to meet this standard during the interview will make you guilty of perjury.

For a family based Green Card, here are a few of the questions you can expect to answer:

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What is your name and your current address?

Have you ever been arrested or convicted of any crimes?

Do you have supporting documents to show me that will help make your case for being approved for a Green Card?

What family member is sponsoring you and what is your relationship to them?

What means do you have to support yourself if you are granted a Green Card?

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I acknowledge and understand that by submitting this Contact Request form through clicking "Check Eligibility!", I provide my express consent to the following: (1) That I am bound by Eligibility.com LLC’s Privacy Policy and Terms of Use; (2) That I am not required to submit this form, and thereby agree to all terms located herein, as a condition to receive any property, goods, or services that may be offered, and that I may revoke my consent at any time.

As part of your Green Card interview, you’ll also be asked to show a good working knowledge of the U.S. government. Some of those questions may include:

Who was the first president of the United States? 

When did the U.S. Civil War take place and what was one of the causes?

When do Americans celebrate Independence Day?

How many senators are there in Congress?

Can you tell me what the name of the United States National anthem is?

Because fraud is common in marriage-based Green Card applications, the line of questioning for this type of application will be particularly rigorous. Marriage-based questions may include:

How did you meet? What was your courtship like? Where did you go on dates and what kind of dates were they? Did your parents approve of your relationship with your spouse?

Tell me about your wedding. How big was it? Was there anything unique about the ceremony? Who was in your wedding party? How would you describe the reception?

After your marriage, what is your daily routine like together? Who does the cooking? Who cleans the house? Who manages the bank account and pays bills? Do you have pets, and if so, what kind and what are their names? Do you go to church on a regular basis?

If you have children, who helps them with their homework? Which parent administers discipline? What are their favorite meals? What activities are they involved with at school?

In the bedroom, what kind of bed do you have and how big is it? Who sleeps on which side of the bed? Do you practice birth control? If so, what kind?

For your home, what is your monthly rent or mortgage payment? How many bathrooms do you have? Is your home one or two stories? Do you have a garage? If so, what is in it? Do you have curtains in your living room? Describe them? 

This line of questioning is extremely detailed and will carry over to other parts of the applicant’s life. You may be asked about your relatives, your spouse’s relatives, how you celebrate holidays and birthdays, what you did on New Year’s Eve, and so on. 

While the questions are extensive, they are designed to make sure couples are really married to each other and not committing an act of fraud.

Eligibility Team

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